ARTICLE 31. COMPOSITA EX PROVOCABULO QUIS, CUM PRAECEDIT

ARTICLE 31. COMPOSITA EX PROVOCABULO QUIS, CUM PRAECEDIT

by William C. Michael

In the last lesson, we studied the declension of the Latin pronouns. For the next four lessons, we will study a number of different composite pronouns, built from the simple pronouns studied in the last lesson, whose meaning and declension are important to know for Latin reading and translation. To complete the objectives of this lesson, complete the following tasks:

- Read through the lesson from beginning to end.
- Study the lesson for mastery, taking notes.
- Complete the lesson assessment.

Lesson

In lesson 31, we continue our study of Latin pronouns by studying a number of different composite pronouns, that is, pronouns composed of simple pronouns studied above. For each of the composite pronouns below, be sure to learn the meaning of the pronoun and how it is declined. An example from the Latin Vulgate is provided to demonstrate each pronoun’s use.

Quisnam, quaenam, quodnam vel quidnam, cuiusnam, cuinam.

- The composite pronoun quisnam is an interrogative pronoun like quis, but is more pressing and urgent. While quis is translated “Who?” or “What”, quisnam is translated, “Who, then?!” or “What, then?!”
- This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the suffix “-nam” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “-nam” to each of the declined forms of “quis”:

“Et mirati sunt omnes, ita ut conquirerent inter se dicentes: Quidnam est hoc? quaenam doctrina haec nova? quia in potestate etiam spiritibus immundis imperat, et obediunt ei.” (Mark 1:27)”And they were all amazed, insomuch that they questioned among themselves, saying: What then is this? what then is this new doctrine? for with power he commandeth even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.”

Quispiam, quaepiam, quodpiam vel quidpiam vel quippiam, cuiuspiam, cuipiam.

- The composite pronoun quispiam is an indefinite pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, quispiam is translated, “anyone” or “anything”.
- This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the suffix “-nam” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “-piam” to each of the declined forms of “quis”.

“Si percusserit quispiam oculum servi sui aut ancillae, et luscos eos fecerit, dimittet eos liberos pro oculo quem eruit.” (Exodus 21:26)”If any man strike the eye of his manservant or maidservant, and leave them but one eye, he shall let them go free for the eye which he put out.”

Quisquam, quaequam, quodquam vel quidquam. cuiusquam cuiquam.

- The composite pronoun quisquam is an indefinite pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, quisquam is translated, “anyone” or “anything”.
- This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the suffix “-quam” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “-quam” to each of the declined forms of “quis”.

“Et nemo poterat ei respondere verbum : neque ausus fuit quisquam ex illa die eum amplius interrogare.” (Matthew 22:46)”And no man was able to answer him a word; neither durst any man from that day forth ask him any more questions.”

Quisque, quaeque, quodque vel quidque, cujusque, cuique.

- The composite pronoun quisque is an indefinite pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, quisque is translated, “whoever” or “whatever”.
- This composite pronoun is formed by simply adding the suffix “-que” to the forms of quis. The pronoun is declined by simply adding “-que” to each of the declined forms of “quis”.

“Quisque vestrum sapiens est, veniat, et faciat quod Dominus imperavit.” (Exodus 35:10)”Whosoever of you is wise, let him come, and make that which the Lord hath commanded.”

Quisquis, quaequae, quidquid; cuiuscuius, cuicui, quemquem, quidquid, a quoquo. Plural: quiqui, quorumquorum, quibusquibus, quosquos, a quibusquibus.

- The composite pronoun quisquis is an indefinite pronoun composed from the simple pronoun quis. While quis is translated “who” or “what”, quisquis is translated, “whosoever” or “whatsoever”.
- This composite pronoun is formed by simply doubling the pronoun quis. The pronoun is declined by simply doubling each of the declined forms of “quis”:

“Quisquis enim potum dederit vobis calicem aquae in nomine meo, quia Christi estis: amen dico vobis, non perdet mercedem suam.” (Mark 9:40)”For whosoever shall give you to drink a cup of water in my name, because you belong to Christ: amen I say to you, he shall not lose his reward.”

William C. Michael, HeadmasterClassical Liberal Arts Academymail@classicalliberalarts.com

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Mr. William C. Michael is the founding headmaster of the <a href=”https://classicalliberalarts.com">Classical Liberal Arts Academy</a>. He graduated from Rutge

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William C. Michael

Mr. William C. Michael is the founding headmaster of the <a href=”https://classicalliberalarts.com">Classical Liberal Arts Academy</a>. He graduated from Rutge